Blog

September 8th, 2014

women-businessWe are excited to sponsor and attend the 2014 Women Business Owners Conference presented by SCORE OC on October 30, 2014. A resource partner with the U.S. Small Business Administration, SCORE offers low-cost workshops and free business mentoring to entrepreneurs throughout the U.S. As expert business technology consultants, we promote business growth and support the efforts of this non-profit in recognizing women-owned businesses. Empowerment is crucial in leading an organization of any size. We look forward to sharing information and helping attendees understand how choosing the right business technology solution can impact their business development and growth.

 
ScoreOC-logoBe sure to visit our table and request a free Financial/Operations Assessment for your small business. Use our Twitter hashtags #WeknowSMB and #SMBTechExperts to connect with us during the event. See you there!
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September 3rd, 2014

BCP_Sep02_CWhile it’s important for businesses to perform risk assessments, it’s equally important to initiate a business impact analysis (BIA) in order to maximize business continuity. Why? Simply because the crux of any recovery is about whether it is achieved in a reasonable time, and BIA, if performed effectively, will determine exactly that. Knowing this, isn’t it time you for you to have a look at some tips for successful business impact analysis?

Five tips for successful business impact analysis:

  1. Treat it as a (mini) project: Define the person responsible for BIA implementation and their authority. You should also define the scope, objective, and time frame in which it should be implemented.
  2. Prepare a good questionnaire: A well structured questionnaire will save you a lot of time and will lead to more accurate results. For example: BS (British standard) 25999-1 and BS 2599902 standards will provide you with a fairly good idea about what your questionnaire should contain. Identifying impacts resulting from disruptions, determining how these vary over time, and identifying resources needed for recovery are often covered in this. It’s also good practice to use both qualitative and quantitative questions to identify impacts.
  3. Define clear criteria: If you’re planning for interviewees to answer questions by assigning values, for instance from one to five, be sure to explain exactly what each of the five marks mean. It’s not uncommon that the same event is evaluated as catastrophic by lower-level employees while top management personnel assess the same event as having a more moderate impact.
  4. Collect data through human interaction: The best way to collect data is when someone skilled in business continuity performs an interview with those responsible for critical activity. This way lots of unresolved questions are cleared up and well-balanced answers are achieved. If interviews are not feasible, do at least one workshop where all participants can ask everything that is concerning them. Avoid the shortcut of simply sending out questionnaires.
  5. Determine the recovery time objectives only after you have identified all the interdependencies: For example, through the questionnaire you might conclude that for critical activity A the maximum tolerable period of disruption is two days; however, the maximum tolerable period of disruption for critical activity B is one day and it cannot recover without the help of critical activity A. This means that the recovery time objective for A will be one day instead of two days.
More often than not, the results of BIA are unexpected and the recovery time objective is longer than it was initially thought. Still, it’s the most effective way to get you thinking and preparing for the issues that could strike your business. When you are carrying out BIA make sure you put in the effort and hours to do it right. Looking to learn more about business continuity? Contact us today.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

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August 25th, 2014

Security_Aug18_CSince the advent of the Internet, hackers have been actively trying to exploit it. Over the past few years, many have targeted different websites to obtain user account details like usernames and passwords. There seems to be a trend where the number of accounts compromised with each new security announcement is rising. In early August, news broke that possibly the largest breach to date has been uncovered.

The latest big-scale breach

In early August, it emerged that a Russian hacker ring had amassed what is believed to be the biggest known collection of stolen account credentials. The numbers include around 1.2 billion username and password combinations, and over 500 million email addresses.
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Topic Security
August 21st, 2014

BValue_Aug18_CThe vast majority of countries in the West have some requirement or law that states that businesses need to meet the needs of their employees. For many businesses this means implementing systems that afford a duty of care and allow employees to do their job adequately. As such, it is a good idea for companies to have an accessible technology plan.

What is accessible technology?

Accessible technology, also commonly referred to as assistive technology, is the idea of creating or implementing technology and systems that cater to employees with disabilities. While not every company will have or require accessible technology, it is required by many countries that businesses meet the needs of disabled employees.
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August 14th, 2014

The data your business generates and captures is among the one of the most important assets available to yourself and your and employees. Unfortunately, the amount of data available is growing exponentially and it can quickly overwhelm many positions. One solution that allows businesses to better manage data is the data warehouse. The only question, is how can you tell when you need one for your business?

What is a data warehouse?

A data warehouse is a system used by companies for data analysis and reporting. The main purpose of the data warehouse is to integrate, or bring together, data from a number of different sources into one centralized location. The vast majority of the data they store is current or historical data that is used to create reports or reveal trends.
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